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Trial of Standing Bear

Events

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A small calendar that is a link to a calendar layout view.
Morn. Twilight: 6:42 A.M.
Sunrise: 7:09 A.M.
Sunset: 7:46 P.M.
Duration: 12h, 37m
Eve. Twilight: 8:14 A.M.
Visibile Light: 13h, 32m

"Fort Omaha Standing Bear Memorial"

Located at 5730 North 30th Street, ((Google Maps logo))

Click to enlarge

IN COMMEMORATION OF THE
"FIRST CONSEQUENCE"
OF
"THE TRIAL OF STANDING BEAR"
AT
FORT OMAHA, OMAHA, NEBRASKA

ON MAY 17, 1879, PONCA CHIEF STANDING BEAR AND 13 OTHER PONCA INDIANS LEFT FORT
OMAHA WITH FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT AT THE REQUEST OF THE RULING BY L.L. DUNDY JUDGE
OF THE U.S. DISTRICT COURT AT OMAHA, NEBRASKA.

THIS HISTORICAL OCCASION WAS INITIATED BY FOUR MEN: T. H. TIBBLES, A.J. POPPELTON, J.L.
WEBSTER, AND MA-CMO-MA-ZAM (STANDING BEAR). WORKING TOGETHER, THEY FILED THE FIRST
WRIT OF MARIAGE COMPUS ON BEHALF OF AN AMERICAN INDIAN. THIS CASE WAS ENTERED
INTO COURT RECORDS AS THE OMITTED STATES IT ILL MA-CMO-MA-ZAM (STANDING BEAR) IT AL
T.S. GEORGE CROOK, A BRIGADIER GENERAL U.S.A. COMMANDING THE DEPARTMENT OF THE PLATTE.
THIS BECAME KNOWN AS THE TRIAL OF STANDING BEAR. IT ESTABLISHED FOR THE FIRST TIME
THAT NATIVE AMERICANS WERE RECOGNIZED AS HAVING PROTECTION UNDER THE U.S. CONSTITUTION.
*



THIS PLAQUE IS INTENDED TO COMMEMORATE A GREAT HISTORICAL EVENT
SPONSORED BY THE PRESERVATION OF THE UNKNOWN INDIAN
PRESENTED BY THE FLETCHER FAMILY
MAY 16, 1944

Note

[Ed Note]: North America got it right 342 years after Spain.*

News

News: The Great Plains Theatre Conference received the 2011 Chief Standing Bear Organizational Award for its 2010 readings of Waaxe's Law. Waaxe's Law is the dramatic retelling of the heartbreaking trial of Chief Standing Bear in Omaha, Neb., in 1879, during which Judge Elmer became the first judge to declare Native Americans to be "persons" under federal law.

The award was presented at the Chief Standing Bear Commemoration Celebration in Lincoln on May 20, 2011.